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Popular Destinations

Nauthusagil

Nauthúsgil (“Bull Shed Ravine”), which lies under the Eyjafjöll volcano, probably derives its name from an original building of a bull shed from the farm Stóru-Mörk. Back then bulls were put out to pasture along with other non-milking stock. An outlying farm called Nauthús was later built, but abandoned in 1770. Nauthúsagil is known for the rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) that grows on its ridge and whose multiple trunks lean over the ravine, some almost horizontally. It’s an impressive sight, especially when the tree is in full bloom. Frequently, the sheep gather close to the roots, providing the rowan with fertilisation. The wood is said to be holy and it is considered bad luck to cut it. The rowan’s exact age is unknown. When its main trunk broke in 1937, the trunk and the biggest branches were cut down and carried off on eight horse carriages. Part of the trunk is now on display at the Skógar Folk Museum and when analysed, it turned out to have been over 90 years old when it broke.

Although the ravine is deep and narrow, you can walk along the river while keeping your feet relatively dry. Walk along the ravine until you come to a 2-3 metre high waterfall. You can climb the rock beside it if you want to. If you continue on your way, you come to a yet larger waterfall which is a sight to behold. You can also walk along the western edge of the ravine where you have a good view of the ravine and a third, beautifully shaped waterfall. You can also enjoy the sight of the Markarfljót catchment area, Stóri-Dímon and Fljótshlíð.

South Iceland, Iceland

Myrdalsjokull

Mýrdalsjökull is an ice cap in the south of Iceland. It is to the north of Vík í Mýrdal and to the east of the smaller ice cap Eyjafjallajökull. Between these two glaciers is Fimmvörðuháls pass. Its peak reaches 1,493 m (4,898 ft) in height and in 1980 it covered an area of 595 km2 (230 sq mi).

The icecap of the glacier covers an active volcano called Katla. The caldera of the volcano has a diameter of 10 km (6 mi) and the volcano erupts usually every 40–80 years. The last eruption took place in 1918. Scientists are actively monitoring the volcano, particularly after the eruption of nearby Eyjafjallajökull began in April 2010. Since the year 930, 16 eruptions have been documented.

The Eldgjá, a volcanic eruption fissure about 30 km (19 mi) long, which erupted in the year 936, is part of the same volcanic system.

South Iceland, Iceland

Thorlakshofn

Þorlákshöfn is a town on the southern coast of Iceland in the Municipality of Ölfus.

The town is named after Saint Thorlak who was a bishop at Skálholt. Its main importance is as a port as it has the only harbour on Iceland's southern coastline between Grindavík in the west and Höfn in the east. The port serves a direct weekly cargo ferry to Rotterdam, operated by faroese Smyril Line. It is also one of two departure points for ferries to the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago. Services include restaurants, tourism, golf course, motocross field, camping, sport complex and a swimming pool. The town has several fish processing enterprises.

South Iceland, Iceland

Hveragerdi

The surrounding area is part of the Hengill central volcano, and is geothermally active and experiences very frequent (usually minor) earthquakes. The town is known for its greenhouses, which are heated by hot water from volcanic hot springs. These springs are the site of occurrence of certain extremophile micro-organisms, that are capable of surviving in extremely hot environments. Close to the church is a hot spring called Sandhólshver, formed during the violent South Iceland earthquake of 1896. A fenced-off geothermal area in the town has numerous hot springs and fumaroles.

Hveragerði contains a number of greenhouses and is a hotbed for Icelandic horticulture.

To the south of Hveragerði, there is the small port of Þorlákshöfn, winter point of departure for the ferry to the Westman Islands.

The local football club is Hamar, who play in Iceland's fourth tier.

South Iceland, Iceland

Gluggafoss

Gluggafoss is a waterfall in southern Iceland. The Merkjá falls down a cliff that formed part of the Icelandic coast just after the last ice age.

South Iceland, Iceland

Ofaerufoss

Ófærufoss is a waterfall situated in the Eldgjá chasm in central Iceland. Until the early 1990s a natural bridge spanned the falls, but it collapsed from natural causes.

South Iceland, Iceland

Frostastadavatn

Frostastaðavatn (Icelandic for lake of the frosty place) is a lake in Iceland. It is situated in the Highlands of Iceland, not far from the famous mountains of Landmannalaugar and the volcano Hekla.

Evidence of volcanism shows around this lake; for example, green and blue water is often found around volcanoes.

South Iceland, Iceland

Hengill

Hengill volcano is situated in the southwest of Iceland, to the south of Þingvellir. The volcano covers an area of about 100 km².

The volcano is still active, evidenced by its numerous hot springs and fumaroles, but the last eruption occurred approximately 2,000 years ago.

The volcano is an important source of energy for the south of the country, which is captured at the Nesjavellir power station (near the western shore of the lake Þingvallavatn) and the Hellisheiði power station (approximately 11 km southwest of Nesjavellir). Both stations are operated by Orkuveita Reykjavíkur (Reykjavik Energy).

The area with its mountains and hot springs is well suited for hiking and there are a lot of hiking trails. The small town of Hveragerði with its multitude of hot springs is also part of the Hengill area.

Some folk tales and sagas are connected to the region. For example, a young farmer is said to have killed the sleeping troll woman Jóra while she lay in wait for innocent wanderers or horsemen on the trail over Dyrafjöll.

South Iceland, Iceland

Urridafoss

Urriðafoss is a waterfall located in the river Þjórsá in southwest Iceland.

The Fossafélagið Títan company was given permission in 1927 to build a power plant in Urriðafoss in connection with a railway to Reykjavík from the waterfall. It did not happen but now Landsvirkjun is planning to build hydropower stations on the lower part of Þjórsár river, at Urriðafoss and Núpur.

The proposed Urriðafoss Power Plant is expected to have a capacity of approximately 125 MW and a power-generating capacity of 930 GWh per year. The powerhouse will be underground and a tunnel leading from the powerhouse will open out into Þjórsá river below Urriðafoss waterfall. The waterfall is expected to disappear if the powerhouse is built. Local residents in the area are protesting against the construction in an effort to save Urriðafoss.

South Iceland, Iceland

Gljufrabui

Gljúfrabúi is a small waterfall north of the larger falls of Seljalandsfoss in Iceland. The falls are partially obscured by the cliff rock, but hikers can follow a trail to enter the narrow canyon where the water plummets to a small pool. There is also a winding trail nearby and a wooden staircase to enable sightseers to climb roughly halfway up and view the falls from another perspective.

South Iceland, Iceland